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Statement
Our Mission
Plight of
Pit Bulls
why do we have dogs?
  - 50K yo relationship
  - companionship
  - protection
  - family member
  - service dog/ medical alert dog        

reasons why people relinquish or abandon their dog
  - financial hardship
  - new baby in the home
  - moving
  - new behavioral issue(s)
  - senior dogs
  - relationship separation or divorce
  - teenage owners neglecting dog or going off to school
    and parents dont want the dog
  - And many other reasons that do not need to lead
to            relinquishment

the reasons why NOT to relinquish or abandon a dog
  - over-crowding of shelters & rescues/
     domestic pet over-population
  - breed discrimination in shelters/ humane societies
  - creating instability in dog
  - creating abandonment/ confidence issues in dog
  - putting behavioral issues of dog on someone else    
  - in separation or divorce, the same comfort the
dog              brought to the couple/ family the dog can
bring to the          single person who can maintain the same
quality of              life for the dog   

recourses to KEEP your dog
  -low/ no income Vet care, vacc, s/n, dog food,
training/         rehab
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A dog's lifespan is fairly short, so that
dog is just a part of your life.  But you
are that dog's entire life, the center of
its world. He gives you unquestioning
affection and companionship.  In return
he asks for little: A home, some food
and the chance to be with you
whenever possible. You owe it to him
to make him a part of your life, to give
him affection, to let him know you are
part of his pack. He will be gone before
you know it and you will regret it if you
give him less than the full measure of
your love.

For too many people, a pet is
expendable, like an old chair or a
sweater that's falling apart.  There are
people who give up a dog because its
hue clashes with the décor.  There are
some people who let a dog die without
at least fighting to make his declining
years comfortable, A dog is a sentient
being, with feelings and a degree of
intelligence we are only now starting to
understand.  A dog is family.

I just did a story about an old dog with
separation anxiety.  His master died
and a relative took the dog to a
shelter. The dog had lived with the
master all its life and suffered
tremendous trauma.  The dog was
lucky enough to be adopted but the
trauma, along with behavioral
problems, wouldn't go away.  Instead
of dumping the dog its new master
arranged for a behaviorist to work with
the animal.  After three sessions,
behavioral problems went away.  
Behavior can be addressed. Some
shelters can offer low-cost  treatment.
There is no need to throw a dog away.

What about the cost of caring for a
dog?  Some people have been
through some very tough times. But
there is help available.  Food Bank of
the Rockies gets pet food collected by
an organization called Furry Friends
Food Drive and distributes it to much
of the state.  Pet stores such as Petco
now collect food for needy animals.  
Call your nearest shelter and ask how
to get help, including low-cost health
services. Two organizations in Denver
offer subsidized care; PetAid Colorado
and Downtown Animal Care. Your  
veterinarian may know others.

Lastly, and most importantly, would-be
adopters should do their homework
before even looking at dogs.  What
breeds are best if you have a small
living space? What breeds have the
best temperament to be with your
children?  Which breeds fit your active
lifestyle?  What breeds prefer a mellow
environment?.  Many shelters are
training their employees to do a better
job of matching dogs and owners, so
do some reading, go on the internet
and be prepared to ask questions.

John Davidson
Former Columnist of
The Denver Post Pet Column
&
Current Examiner.com Columnist
We adopted Fiona about 3 years ago after I fell in love with her
while volunteering at a shelter.  We already had a 10 year old pit
bull named Raleigh that my husband had raised from a pup, and
we thought Fiona would fit right in.  Fiona loved Raleigh and was
very good with people but had some fear issues upon meeting new
dogs.  She was also a really bad puller on leash.  We tried every
type of device out there and obedience classes and nothing
worked.  My husband and I had never experienced a dog that
pulled as much as Fiona.  We knew that she needed an outlet so
we taught her how to play Frisbee.  Now we don’t go a day without
it!  We lost Raleigh in February of 2013 and in the same month
discovered we were going to have a baby.  Fiona was heartbroken
about Raleigh and wanted to be us all the time.  She is like our
child so of course we never excluded her from anything.  Having
volunteered at a shelter, I have heard the common excuse for
relinquishing a pet being “we are going to have a baby.”  My
husband and I cannot even fathom this.  Fiona is our child and it
has never been and option for us to get rid of her like a piece of
unwanted property.  So, as the pregnancy went on, we included
Fiona in anything we did especially involving getting the house
ready for baby.  She would lie in the nursery while we got it ready,
or take much needed naps along my side.  We would let her know
if a toy wasn’t hers and to this day, she still does not touch our
baby’s toys.  We have worked with her about her boundaries (she
is somewhat of a bull in a china shop), and how to be calm in the
home.  We worked with a trainer regarding her pulling on walks,
and now I can walk her alongside my stroller.  Our son Logan
thinks Fiona is the coolest thing he has ever seen.  She likes him
and he laughs hysterically.  At night, our bed still consists of my
husband, myself, Fiona, and the cat.  We have maintained her
daily Frisbee romps in the backyard since that is something she
truly loves to do.  Fiona has become a wonderful family dog and I
can’t imagine ever discarding her.